Friday, June 1, 2012

CBSE - Class 9 - Political Science- CH1- Democracy in Contemporary World

Poll Box
(source:openclipart.org)

MCQs, NCERT Chapter Solutions and other Q & A



Q1: Which of the following does not lead to the spread of democracy?
(a) Struggle by the people
(b) Invasion by foreign countries
(c) End of colonialism
(d) People’s desire for freedom

Answer: (b) Invasion by foreign countries



Q2: Which of the following statement is true about today’s world?
(a) Monarchy as a form of government has vanished
(b) The relationship between different countries has become more democratic than ever before.
(c) In more and more countries rulers are being elected by the people.
(d) There are no more military dictators in the world.

Answer: (c) In more and more countries rulers are being elected by the people.

Q3: Use one of the following statements to complete the sentence:
       Democracy in the international organisations requires that …

(a) The rich countries should have a greater say.
(b) Countries should have a say according to their military power.
(c) Countries should be treated with respect in proportion to their population.
(d) All countries in the world should be treated equally.

Answer: (d) All countries in the world should be treated equally.

Q4: Based on the information given in this chapter, match the following countries and the path democracy has taken in that country.
COUNTRY                PATH TO DEMOCRACY
a Chilei Freedom from British colonial rule
b Nepalii End of military dictatorship
c Polandiii End of one party rule
d Ghanaiv King agreed to give up his powers

Answer: a-ii , b-iv, c-iii, d-i

Q5(CBSE 2010):Which one of the following statements is incorrect?
(a) America became independent from British rule in 1776
(b) They adopted a democratic constitution in 1787
(c) Many countries in Europe gave right to vote to only propertied people
(d) In United States of America all the citizens including Blacks were given right to vote from the beginning.

Answer: (d) In United States of America all the citizens including Blacks were given right to vote from the beginning.

Q6: How many member states are there in the International Monetary Fund?
(a) 173
(b) 192
(c) 200
(d) 190

Answer: (a) 173

Q7(CBSE 2010): Which country among the following was the only country by 1900, where every citizen had voting right?
                                    OR
Q: Which one of the following countries was the first to grant "Universal Suffrage"?
(a) Australia
(b) New Zealand
(c) Poland
(d) USA

Answer: (b) New Zealand

Q8: Which country supported and controlled the autocratic government in Poland?
(a) USA
(b) China
(c) Russia
(d) UK

Answer:  (c) Russia

Q9(CBSE 2010):  Who was the leader of Solidarity Movement in Poland?
(a) Michelle Bachelete
(b) Salvador Allende 
(c) Lech Walesa 
(d) Pinochet

Answer: (c) Lech Walesa 

Q10: Why was International Monetary Fund established?
(a) To maintain peace and security among the countries
(b) Lends money to governments of member nations when in need
(c) To implement and formulate trade agreements
(d) To take decision regarding misery and poverty of western countries

Answer: (b) Lends money to governments of member nations when in need

Q11: Which one of the following countries is not a permanent member of UN Security Council?
(a) China 
(b) France 
(c) Japan 
(d) Russia

Answer: (c) Japan


Q12: Which freedoms are ususally taken away when a democracy is overthrown by the military?

Answer: 
  1. Political Freedom is lost. When a democracy is overthrown by the military, the freedom to choose their leader is snatched away. E.g. In Chile and in Mynmar people could not elect their leaders due to military rule.
  2. Civil Freedom is curtailed. There is no real freedom to express one’s opinions, form political associations and organise protests and political action.
  3. Democratic and Constitutional (freedom)rights are lost. Anyone can be put in prison for trivial reasons.

Q 13: What are the difficulties people face in a non-democratic country? Give answers drawing from the examples given in this chapter.

Answer
  1. The people cannot not choose or change their rulers. E.g. In Chile, Mynmar people could not elect their leaders due to military rule.
  2. There was is real freedom to express one’s opinions. There is fear that they can be arrested for any trivial matter. E.g. in Poland in 1980, it was prohibited to form another political party or association. 
  3. They cannot form political associations and organize protests and political action.
  4. In general, non-democratic rulers, directly or indirectly, are controlled by the business elite who have vested interests. Economic development growth is arrested and socio-economic conditions of the poor people deteriorate. 
Q 14: Which of the following positions can contribute to democracy at the global level? Give reasons for your answer in each case. 

a My country gives more money to international institutions. Therefore, I want to be treated with more respect and exercise more power. 

b My country may be small or poor. But my voice must be heard with equal respect, because these decisions will affect my country.

c Wealthy nations will have a greater say in international affairs. They cannot let their interests suffer just because they are outnumbered by poor nations.

d Big countries like India must have a greater say in international organisations.

Answer
(a) NO, it does not promote democracy. Democracy ensures equality irrespective the person or the country is rich or poor. 

(b) Yes, the statement supports democracy. The basic objective of democracy is to provide equality and it should work the betterment for all sections of the society.

(c) No, it does not contribute to the spirit of democracy. Democracy ensures equal opportunities for both poor and rich. Otherwise, international policies will be governed by the rich countries.

(d) No, it does not support democracy fully. India being developing nation and the most populous  state, represent the voice of the masses. Her opinions must be valued and heard at international arena, but any country should not be privileged based on geographical or population size.

Q15: Which East European countries were ruled by the communist parties in 1980s?

Answer: East European countries ruled by the communist parties in 1980s were:
  1. Poland
  2. Russia
  3. Ukraine
  4. Romania
  5. Bulgaria
Q16: Here are three opinions heard in a television debate on the struggle for democracy in Nepal. Which of these do you agree with and why?

Guest 1: India is a democracy. Therefore, the Indian government must support the people of Nepal who are struggling against monarchy and for democracy.

Guest 2: That is a dangerous argument. We would be in the same position as the US was in Iraq. Remember, no outside force can promote democracy.

Guest 3: But why should we bother about the internal affairs of another country? We should be worried about our business interests there, not about democracy.

Answer: I agree with Statement made by Guest 1. India became a democratic republic after a long struggle for Independence. It values democratic principles and has been a promoter of peace and non-violence. By following democratic and non-violent approaches at international forum (e.g. public opinion, debates etc.) it can support people of Nepal restore democracy.

Q17(CBSE): Which one of the following is the best way to establish democracy in a country?
(a) Foreign aggression by a democratic country
(b) People’s struggle within their own country.
(c) Resolution by the U.N. General Assembly.
(d) Voluntary support by the majority of the people.

Answer: (d) Voluntary support by the majority of the people.

Q18: What reforms were carried out by Allende in Chile?  How was it taken by opposition parties?

Answer: Allende as the president of Chile introduced a number of social reforms. 
  1. He took several policy decisions to help the poor and the workers.
  2. He introduced reforms to the educational system. 
  3. He provided free milk for children and redistribution of land to the landless farmers. 
  4. He opposed to foreign companies taking away natural resources like copper from the country.
The rich, capitalists, the Church and the opposition parties were against his policies specially distribution of land to landless farmers and his opposition towards foreign companies.

Q19: Why did USA support the military coup in Chile in 1973?

Answer: USA being a capitalist country was against the policies of socialist president Allende. They supported the military and the capitalists of Chile who were opposing Allende's social reforms.

Q20(CBSE 2010): A direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal.
(a) Plebiscite
(b) Referendum
(c) Recall
(d) Veto

Answer: (b) Referendum
(Note: Plebiscite also mean referendum, From NCERT book definition, answer should should be 'referendum')

Q21: What did Allende hope for in his last address?
Answer: During the coup, when democratic government was toppled, Allende addressed to his nation. He hoped that Democracy would be restored and felony, cowardice and treason would be finally punished.

Q22: Why were women given voting rights much later than men in the most countries? Why did this not happen in India?

Answer: Although political struggle for democracy started since nineteenth century and many European countries became democratic by the beginning of the twentieth century. At that time women were not given voting rights, because they were not being considered equal. Their political representation was given enough importance. The were granted rights much later than men. In India this was not the case. The Constitution of India granted universal suffrage to all its citizens irrespective they belong to different gender or community or caste.

Q23: What was the 'voting rights' situation in USA after she adopted constitution? When was universal adult franchise granted there?

Answer:  USA adopted constitution in 1787, but here too the right to vote was limited to very few men. In 1965, after a long struggle,  universal adult franchise was granted to all citizens, including women and Afro-americans.

Q24: ‘The disintegration of the Soviet Union accelerated the process of expansion of democracy.’ Give reasons.

Answer: After 1980, the disintegration of the Soviet Union accelerated the process of democracy.
  1. Soviet Union controlled several European countries and all of them were communist governments.
  2. Poland and several other countries became free from the control of the Soviet Union during 1989-90. They chose to become democracies.
  3. The Soviet Union comprised of 15 republics emerged as independent
    democratic countries after the USSR broke down.
Q25: Who was Lech Walesa? How did he become famous in Poland?

Answer: Lech Walesa was a former electrician of Lenin Shipyard in the city of
Gdansk. He joined and led the strikers who
  • demanded for higher wages, 
  • right to form independent trade unions, 
  • the release of political prisoners and 
  • an end to censorship on press.
Finally the Polish government gave in and signed 21-point agreement with Lech Walesa and his workers. A new trade union called Solidarity was formed under his leadership. General Jaruzeleski imposed martial law which led to another wave of strikes by Solidarity. Later in 1988, the union won elections with absolute majority and Walesa was elected as the president of Poland.

Q26(CBSE): How democratic is the International Monetary Fund (IMF)?

Answer:
  1. IMF a special agency affiliated with United Nations has been one of the biggest moneylender for any country in the world.
  2. Its working is not fairly democratic because its 185 members do not have equal voting rights.
  3. The vote of each country is weighed by how much money it has contributed to the IMF. 
  4. Since the top 10 developed countries have large contributions, they have a major say in IMF. These 10 countries have More than 54%of the voting power in the IMF. 
  5. While the remaining 175 countries have negligible participation in IMF policy making. This is undemocratic.

Q27: What happened to democracy in Ghana?

Answer:
  1. Ghana (earlier called Gold Coast), used to be a British Colony, got independent in 1957. 
  2. Kwame Nkrumah, son of a goldsmith and himself a teacher played an active role in independence struggle.
  3. After independence, he became first prime minister and then the president of Ghana.
  4. Later he declared himself as elected president for life and established dictatorship.
  5. In 1966, he was overthrown by the military and Ghana couldn’t remain a democratic nation for long.
Q28: Which among the following was NOT the demand raised by striking workers in Poland?
(a) Right to form trade unions
(b) Release of Political Prisoners
(c) Stepping down of Communists
(d) End of censorship on press.

Answer: (c) Stepping down of Communists

Q29:  Who among the following had replaced Salvador Allende?
(a) General Augusto Pinochet
(b) General Jeruzelski
(c) Lech Walesa
(d) Michelle Bachelet

Answer: (a) General Augusto Pinochet





65 comments:

  1. plz give more question and answers!!!!!!!!!

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  2. Thanks a lot... Really Helped!!

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  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  4. where is chapter 2 civiics? plz tell on srivastavayuktha@gmail.com

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  5. Why did lakhs of people from Myanmar leave their country?

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    1. The population of Burma, according to July 2000 estimates, was 41,734,853. A high mortality rate caused by AIDS is factored into this estimate; it is estimated that at least 1 million people are infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. This high mortality rate from AIDS has slowed population growth to a projected rate of growth of 0.64 percent. The country registered a birth rate of 20.61 per 1000 population and a death rate of 12.35 per 1000; consequently, the population of Burma in 2015 is expected to be 45,925,967.

      In the past, the government of Burma sought to restrict emigration (people leaving the country) and immigration (people settling there from outside the country). Burmese authorities negotiated with India to reduce the number of people of Indian origin in the country. As a result, Burma repatriated about 100,000 people to India between 1963 and 1965. Thousands of Burmese also fled to neighboring countries to escape military repression and armed conflicts in the ethnic minority areas.

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  6. After second world war,a chain of events led to a democracy.How?

    please tell me imidtly

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  7. was very help full.!!!!!!!
    thank you so much.........

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  8. The answer for the first MCQ is invasion by foreign countries not end of colonialism....lost 1 mark in exam :'(

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  9. Thnks Bcoz our class teacher told to make own answers.

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  10. pls !!!!!! add more question answers .....................

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  11. Q 26 is wrong i guess b'cause there r 188 members in IMF

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  12. and plz add more questions
    civics is very difficult

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  13. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  14. Q.Give any five arguments against democracy. - 5 marks :-Please help me immediately on 22_9_14 is my SSt exam.

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    1. 1. Delay in Decision making: So many levels of discussions and many people involves often lead to delays.
      2. Political groups compete with each other. It leads to instability. Power play leads to immorality.
      3. Frequent changes in leadership affects government efficiency.
      4. Democracy ensures that people participate in decision making. But people can make mistakes.
      5. Political competition can lead to corruption.

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  15. Q. measures adopted by pinochet after coming to power....3 marks/....ut on 11th may 15....help plzzzz asap\

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  16. I hv a ut tomorrow plzzzzzzz help......

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  17. The worst site I hv ever seen..........
    Hate this site a lot.............$%?&#?&%$

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  18. why did general jaruzelski imposed martial law in poland in december 1981

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    Replies
    1. Jaruzelski imposed martial law in 1981 citing the following reasons:
      - civil unrest due to rise in crime
      - to prevent soviet invasion.
      However his real reason was to oppress newly born civil society which was opposing autocratic communist regime

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  19. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  20. describe the main featues of communist rule in poland.

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    Replies
    1. 1) Non responsible government.
      2) Non sovereign.
      3) No political or single party.
      4) No freedom rights.

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  21. good but u can add more long answer questions

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  22. urgent question
    does international organisations promote democracy at global level justify ur answer?

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    Replies

    1. International democracy has become a key aspect of the contemporary academic and political debate. It is a relatively recent trend in international politics, as shown by the fact that in 1945 – when the UN was established – no international parliamentary assembly existed in the world. And yet, 39 parliamentary assemblies have been established after World War II and most of them in the post-Cold War period. The widely felt need for democracy at international level is a consequence of three phenomena: the regional integration and globalization processes, the erosion of state sovereignty and the democratic deficit of the international organizations. Even though a comprehensive survey of this area would be timely for several reasons, it was not available until now.

      The basic hypothesis, confirmed by the present report, is that the ground where international democracy has developed most – and earlier than within the UN itself – is that of international organizations of regional dimensions. The democratization of regional organizations is a worldwide process, which is developing at an uneven pace. The research has shown that Europe is the cradle of international democracy. Here, it firstly materialized in 1949 with the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, an international organization which does not have any ambition to promote integration policies, whose parliamentary assembly is not endowed with any legislative competence. Instead, within the framework of the European Communities and the European Union, a process of economic integration developed, which led to the establishment of the European Parliament, the first directly elected supranational Parliament in history and the world vanguard of the experiment of international democracy. In Latin America, other regional Parliaments have been directly elected: the Parlacen in Central America and the Parlandino in the Andean Community, and the direct election of the Parlasur in MERCOSUR is announced.

      At the same time, another evolution is in progress in the EU: the European Parliament has progressively increased its legislative powers, while almost all the other Parliamentary Assemblies – included the above-mentioned directly elected Latin-American Parliaments – have advisory powers only. However, in spite of their limited influence, these assemblies try to balance the power that governments exert at international level. They hold debates, put forward proposals and recommendations, approve resolutions and exert their pressure on governments. All these parliamentary activities, whose purpose is to influence governments – and more precisely to shift parliamentary control to the international level –, are aspects of a general process that culminates in the European Parliament, whose structure shows that the EU is moving in the direction of a form of federal arrangement. The institutional evolution of the EU shows that in Europe new forms of statehood at international level are materializing. In other words, the EU is the vanguard of a process of constitutionalization and democratization of international relations. In the light of this process, national Parliaments represent the past, an outdated form of democracy. It is to be remarked that, despite the lack of structures for citizens’ participation in the international institutions (Parliaments, elections, political parties and so forth), the global civil society movements are a forerunner manifestation of international democracy. They are the expression of new forms of international political activism in a world where formal democratic structures fit for channelling international political participation are lacking.

      The International Democracy Watch plans to continue its activity in the future. It will monitor the quality and the intensity of the democratic transformations under way within the international organizations in order to survey progress (or regress) of international democracy. The second report will be focused on movements and campaigns for international democracy.

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  23. CAN U PLEASE REPLY THIS QUESTION

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  24. Replies
    1. Martial law is the imposition of the highest-ranking military officer as the military governor or as the head of the government, thus removing all power from the previous executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.

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  25. wow this really helped!
    thks so much!

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  26. Questions and answers are good,but still improvement is required in publishing of more important and previous years question papers and also some study notes of each chapter.

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  27. Replies
    1. Aung San Suu Kyi, (Burmese: အောင်ဆန်းစုကြည်; MLCTS: aung hcan: cu. krany, /aʊŋˌsæn.suːˈtʃiː/, Burmese pronunciation: [àʊɴ sʰáɴ sṵ tɕì]; born 19 June 1945) is a Burmese social democratic stateswoman, politician, diplomat and author who serves as the First and incumbent State Counsellor and Leader of the National League for Democracy. She is also the first female Minister of Foreign Affairs of Myanmar and the Minister of President's Office in President Htin Kyaw's Cabinet, and from 2012 to 2016 was a Pyithu Hluttaw MP for Kawhmu Township.

      The youngest daughter of Aung San, Father of the Nation of modern-day Myanmar, and Khin Kyi, Aung San Suu Kyi was born in Rangoon, British Burma. After graduating from the University of Delhi in 1964 and the University of Oxford in 1968, she worked at the United Nations for three years. She married Michael Aris in 1972, and gave birth to two children. Aung San Suu Kyi rose to prominence in the 1988 Uprisings, and became the General Secretary of the newly formed National League for Democracy (NLD). In the 1990 elections, NLD won 81% of the seats in Parliament, but the results were nullified, as the military refused to hand over power, resulting in an international outcry. She had, however, already been detained under house arrest before the elections. She remained under house arrest for almost 15 of the 21 years from 1989 to 2010, becoming one of the world's most prominent political prisoners.

      Her party boycotted the 2010 elections, resulting in a decisive victory for the military-backed Union Solidarity and Development Party. Aung San Suu Kyi became a Pyithu Hluttaw MP while her party won 43 of the 45 vacant seats in the 2012 by-elections. In the 2015 elections, her party won a landslide victory, taking 86% of the seats in the Assembly of the Union — well more than the 67 percent supermajority needed to ensure that its preferred candidates were elected President and Second Vice President in the Presidential Electoral College. Although she was prohibited from becoming the President due to a clause in the constitution – her late husband and children are foreign citizens – she assumed the newly created role of State Counsellor, a role akin to a Prime Minister or a head of government.

      Aung San Suu Kyi has gained international acclaim, having received many honours, including the: Rafto Prize, Sakharov Prize, Nobel Peace Prize, Jawaharlal Nehru Award, Order of Australia, US Congressional Gold Medal, and Presidential Medal of Freedom. She is an honorary citizen of many countries, including Canada, and was an honorary member of Nelson Mandela's Elders.

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    2. Aung San Suu Kyi, (Burmese: အောင်ဆန်းစုကြည်; MLCTS: aung hcan: cu. krany, /aʊŋˌsæn.suːˈtʃiː/, Burmese pronunciation: [àʊɴ sʰáɴ sṵ tɕì]; born 19 June 1945) is a Burmese social democratic stateswoman, politician, diplomat and author who serves as the First and incumbent State Counsellor and Leader of the National League for Democracy. She is also the first female Minister of Foreign Affairs of Myanmar and the Minister of President's Office in President Htin Kyaw's Cabinet, and from 2012 to 2016 was a Pyithu Hluttaw MP for Kawhmu Township.

      The youngest daughter of Aung San, Father of the Nation of modern-day Myanmar, and Khin Kyi, Aung San Suu Kyi was born in Rangoon, British Burma. After graduating from the University of Delhi in 1964 and the University of Oxford in 1968, she worked at the United Nations for three years. She married Michael Aris in 1972, and gave birth to two children. Aung San Suu Kyi rose to prominence in the 1988 Uprisings, and became the General Secretary of the newly formed National League for Democracy (NLD). In the 1990 elections, NLD won 81% of the seats in Parliament, but the results were nullified, as the military refused to hand over power, resulting in an international outcry. She had, however, already been detained under house arrest before the elections. She remained under house arrest for almost 15 of the 21 years from 1989 to 2010, becoming one of the world's most prominent political prisoners.

      Her party boycotted the 2010 elections, resulting in a decisive victory for the military-backed Union Solidarity and Development Party. Aung San Suu Kyi became a Pyithu Hluttaw MP while her party won 43 of the 45 vacant seats in the 2012 by-elections. In the 2015 elections, her party won a landslide victory, taking 86% of the seats in the Assembly of the Union — well more than the 67 percent supermajority needed to ensure that its preferred candidates were elected President and Second Vice President in the Presidential Electoral College. Although she was prohibited from becoming the President due to a clause in the constitution – her late husband and children are foreign citizens – she assumed the newly created role of State Counsellor, a role akin to a Prime Minister or a head of government.

      Aung San Suu Kyi has gained international acclaim, having received many honours, including the: Rafto Prize, Sakharov Prize, Nobel Peace Prize, Jawaharlal Nehru Award, Order of Australia, US Congressional Gold Medal, and Presidential Medal of Freedom. She is an honorary citizen of many countries, including Canada, and was an honorary member of Nelson Mandela's Elders.

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  28. And why was she under house arrest. I need answers in 12 hours plz.

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  29. And why was she under house arrest. I need answers in 12 hours plz.

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  30. plz answer

    What were the challenges before the members of the constitution in the assembly?

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  31. thanks for your help i got full marks in my exams

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